News Line

How to Avoid Scary Blood Sugars around Halloween

With Halloween near, the aisles at the grocery store are filled with sweets. Whether you celebrate the holiday or not it can be hard to resist the temptation of your favorite candy on sale. For people with diabetes it’s okay to treat yourself, but don’t go overboard. You can find the carbohydrate content of any food on the nutrition label; look for the serving size and the amount of total carbohydrate, not just sugars. Most fun-size candies have 10-15 grams of carbohydrate.

Treats don’t have to be sweet. Consider other Halloween snacks like single serving bags of popcorn or pretzels. If you celebrate with your kids, treats can also be stickers or small toys. Trick-or-treating isn’t the only way to enjoy Halloween; try a fun activity like carving pumpkins or going on a haunted hayride. Roasted pumpkin seeds are a great snack; try them plain, sprinkled with cinnamon or spice them up with some cayenne pepper. Baked apples are another nutritious alternative to enjoy with family and friends.

If you have an abundance of candy left over, use it sparingly as a lunchbox treat or an after-dinner dessert. Eating a piece of candy alone can raise blood sugar quickly, so try to incorporate it as part of a well-rounded meal instead. Fun-Size sweets can be used as a treatment for low blood sugar, but choose candies like Smarties or Lifesavers and avoid candy higher in protein and fat like chocolate bars.

Date Published: Tuesday, October 24, 2017